Technorati Blog Claiming FAQ

Welcome to Technorati's blog claiming FAQ. Claiming your blog helps interested readers find the great content you write. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions:

Why should I claim my blog?

Claiming your blog will add it to Technorati's Blog Directory, in the categories you specify, and will let you see links from sites in our index to your blog. You can also specify tags for your blog, and it will appear in the lists of blogs on our Tag pages for those tags. If there are links to your blog, we will track your Technorati Authority over time Your claimed blog will also appear on your public profile page, so anyone who views that page (perhaps clicking through from a comment you make) will see it.

How do I claim my blog?

Simply sign in and go to your personal profile page by clicking on your name in the top right of any page. You will see the place to begin your claim by entering your blog URL just after the section that contains your profile image. If you do not already have a Technorati account you can sign up for free in less than a minute here.

What does Technorati do with claimed blogs?

Blogs claimed by Technorati members are added to the Technorati Blog Directory. The member claiming the blog can also supply categories and blog tags for the blog, and we will include the blog in the blog lists for those categories and tags. You can specify up to three categories for your blog, and Technorati users will be able to find them in those categories. Not all claimed blogs are added to our index, which is the list of sites that we crawl to collect content from. Sites must be included in our index to contribute to Technorati Authority or for their content to appear in search results. We are constantly reviewing additional sites for inclusion in the index.

I'm having trouble claiming my blog! What's wrong?

There are a number of possible causes of claim failures. Here are some pointers to help make your claim successful:

1) Don't redirect A redirect is a mechanism for telling a browser, or anyone trying to find content at a given URL that they should look at a different URL. For example, some who used to have a blog at http://myOldOldBlogSite.zzz and now has a blog at http://mySnazzyNewSite.zzz might set up a redirect so that anyone going to the old site gets automatically sent on to the new site. This can be quite useful, but if you do this, please do NOT try to claim the old site URL. When it tells us there's nothing there and we should look elsewhere, we believe it, so we don't want to add the old URL to our system. If you want to claim the new site, please do, but use the new URL. Of course, we don't have a problem with minor redirects that are essentially the same location, such as redirects that add or remove www or a slash at the end of the URL, or to go from http://mySnazzyNewSite.zzz to http://mySnazzyNewSite.zzz/index.php

2) Make sure the claim code (also called the claim token) is in a post and is visible in your feed. Technorati relies very heavily on feeds for all of our processing, so make sure we can find the code there. And the code needs to be in a post -- there are too many ways to get text onto someone else's blog page, so we require that you demonstrate that you can actually make or edit a post to claim a blog.

We realize that putting this odd code text into your feed means that all of your feed followers (and perhaps Twitter, Facebook, and other sites) will see it, but it's the best method we've found so far to demonstrate to us that you control the blog. You can remove the code once the claim is complete.

It's probably best to put the code at the beginning of an existing post, and then remove it after claiming. Many feeds do not include the full post, so putting it at the start of a post ensures it gets into your feed. Then when you're done, you can remove it and it's gone. If you create a new post for the code and then delete the entire post, many systems cannot tell if the post was deleted or just aged off of the feed like an old (but still valid) post, so may not remove it when you do.

3) Do not block Technorati using the robots.txt access control mechanism. Web sites can host a file named robots.txt that specifies what automated software ("robots") are allowed to access. Not all software obeys these directions, but Technorati does, so if you have a robots.txt file that doesn't allow us to read your site, we won't.

If you use a blogging service such as BlogSpot or LiveJournal, this is likely controlled via your blog settings for privacy. Look for settings relating to allowing search engines to index your blog.

If you are hosting your own site, make sure to permit access to TechnoratiBot (currently our UserAgent is TechnoratiBot/8.1). You can learn more about using robots.txt and the Robots Exclusion Standard at robots.org or Wikipedia.

Also see Technorati's Support Page and our forums at GetSatisfaction.com/Technorati. Check out the updates on the right side for the most recent problem information from Technorati.