Feature: UFOs: Pimp My Reality

Brits May Hand UFO Hacker to Uncle Sam on a Silver Saucer

Author: Tim Brosnan
Published: May 27, 2010 at 8:53 am
Share

U.K. computer hacker Gary McKinnon's legion of vocal supporters rejoiced last week when British Home Secretary Theresa May announced that she was putting the brakes on U.S. efforts to extradite him.

This week, however, they're furious over Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg's assertion that his government, in effect, has to do whatever our government tells it to do.

Accused of breaking into NASA and U.S. Army computers in 2001 and 2002, the 44-year-old McKinnon could face up to 60 years in prison if convicted in this country. He says that he was looking for – and found – evidence of extraterrestrial activity on planet Earth.


The jury’s still out on that one, but McKinnon’s lawyers argue that extraditing their client, who suffers from Asperger Syndrome , would constitute a breach of his human rights. Moreover, seven years into his extradition tug-of-war with the United States, McKinnon has become suicidal.

Human rights issues notwithstanding, London’s Daily Mail reported May 26 that Deputy Prime Minister Clegg believes that it “may not be within (his) Government’s power” to fight extradition.

Think about that.

Can you imagine the Vice President of the United States trying to convince us that our government is powerless against extradition proceedings being brought against one of our citizens by another country?  Becuase that’s exactly how Clegg is describing his country’s relationship with the United States. The term “prison bitch” comes to mind.

Charges filed against McKinnon allege that he caused roughly $700,000 in damages to NASA and U.S. Army computers. That's all. About what you’d pay for a Bentley sedan. No lives were lost, no launch codes compromised.

When Clegg was running for office in July 2009, he said that it was “completely within (former Home Secretary Alan Johnson’s) power to enact amendments … which would allow Gary McKinnon to be tried (in the U.K.)” Now that he’s Deputy Prime Minister, however, he’s saying that he doesn’t think that anybody in the British government has the power to do so.


His excuse? “It’s legally very complex.”

You'll have to do better than that, Mr. Clegg. And somebody on this side of the pond needs to offer a more convincing explanation for all the fuss than $700,000 in damages.

What did Gary McKinnon see?

 
 

About this article

Profile image for actordesigner

Article Author: Tim Brosnan

Tim Brosnan covers ufology for Technorati. A freelance feature writer, photographer, print designer and performer, he's lived and worked from New England to Florida to California. He's served as marketing director for a small professional theater in …

Tim Brosnan's author pageAuthor's Blog

Article Tags

Share: Bookmark and Share